A. Carvalho

A. Carvalho
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Physics - Mesoscopic Systems and Quantum Hall Effect (15)
 
Physics - Materials Science (12)
 
Quantum Physics (8)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (5)
 
Mathematics - Dynamical Systems (5)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (3)
 
Mathematics - Analysis of PDEs (2)
 
General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology (2)
 
Physics - Soft Condensed Matter (2)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (2)
 
Physics - Optics (2)
 
Physics - Biological Physics (2)
 
Nonlinear Sciences - Chaotic Dynamics (1)
 
Quantitative Biology - Genomics (1)
 
Mathematics - Geometric Topology (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Theory (1)
 
Physics - Physics and Society (1)
 
Quantitative Biology - Biomolecules (1)
 
Physics - Statistical Mechanics (1)
 
Computer Science - Learning (1)
 
Mathematics - Optimization and Control (1)
 
Quantitative Biology - Populations and Evolution (1)

Publications Authored By A. Carvalho

Let $f\colon I\to I$ be a unimodal map with topological entropy $h(f)>\frac12\log2$, and let $\widehat{f}\colon\widehat{I}\to\widehat{I}$ be its natural extension, where $\widehat{I}=\varprojlim(I,f)$. Subject to some regularity conditions, which are satisfied for tent maps and quadratic maps, we give a complete description of the prime ends of the Barge-Martin embedding of $\widehat{I}$ into the disk, and identify the prime ends rotation number with the height of $f$. We also show that $\widehat{f}$ is semi-conjugate to a sphere homeomorphism by a semi-conjugacy for which all fibers except one contain at most three points. Read More

We investigate Higgs-boson pair production at the LHC when the final state system arises from decays of vector-like quarks coupling to the Higgs boson and the Standard Model quarks. Our phenomenological study includes next-to-leading-order QCD corrections, which are important to guarantee accurate predictions, and focuses on a detailed analysis of a di-Higgs signal in the four $b$-jet channel. Whereas existing Run II CMS and ATLAS analyses are not specifically designed for probing non-resonant, vector-like-quark induced, di-Higgs production, we show that they nevertheless offer some potential for these modes. Read More

The barocaloric effect is still an incipient scientific topic, but it has been attracting an increasing attention in the last years due to promising perspectives for application in alternative cooling devices. Here, we present giant values of barocaloric entropy change and temperature change induced by low pressure changes in the PDMS elastomer around room temperature. We report an entropy change of 69 J kg-1 K-1 for a pressure change of 130 MPa; and temperature changes of 12. Read More

We propose a novel model for including spin-orbit interactions in buckled two dimensional systems. Our results show that in such systems, intrinsic spin-orbit coupling leads to a formation of Dirac cones, similar to Rashba model. We explore the microscopic origins of this behaviour and confirm our results using DFT calculations. Read More

Fluctuation Theorems are central in stochastic thermodynamics, as they allow for quantifying the irreversibility of single trajectories. Although they have been experimentally checked in the classical regime, a practical demonstration in the framework of quantum open systems is still to come. Here we propose a realistic platform to probe fluctuation theorems in the quantum regime. Read More

Previously published admissibility conditions for an element of $\{0,1\}^{\mathbb{Z}}$ to be the itinerary of a point of the inverse limit of a tent map are expressed in terms of forward orbits. We give necessary and sufficient conditions in terms of backward orbits, which is more natural for inverse limits. These backward admissibility conditions are not symmetric versions of the forward ones: in particular, the maximum backward itinerary which can be realised by a tent map mode locks on intervals of kneading sequences. Read More

The dynamics of systems subjected to noise is called Markovian in the absence of memory effects, i.e. when its immediate future only depends on its present. Read More

Chemical or enzymatic cross-linking of casein micelles (CMs) increases their stability against dissociating agents. In this paper, a comparative study of stability between native CMs and CMs cross-linked with genipin (CMs-GP) as a function of pH is described. Stability to temperature and ethanol were investigated in the pH range 2. Read More

Barocaloric effect in vulcanized natural rubber (V-NR) has been investigated. Direct measurements of the temperature change ({\Delta}T) around room temperature (283-333 K) resulted in large values, above 10 K, for a pressure change of 173 MPa. A power law was proposed to fit {\Delta}T as function of the maximum pressure, showing to be suitable for the barocaloric effect in V-NR. Read More

Barocaloric materials have shown to be promising alternatives to the conventional vapor-compression refrigeration technologies. Nevertheless, barocaloric effect ({\sigma}b-CE) has not been extensively examined for many classes of materials up to now. Aiming at fulfilling this gap, this paper describes the development of a high-pressure experimental setup for measuring the {\sigma}b-CE in polymers. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: D. de Florian1, C. Grojean2, F. Maltoni3, C. Mariotti4, A. Nikitenko5, M. Pieri6, P. Savard7, M. Schumacher8, R. Tanaka9, R. Aggleton10, M. Ahmad11, B. Allanach12, C. Anastasiou13, W. Astill14, S. Badger15, M. Badziak16, J. Baglio17, E. Bagnaschi18, A. Ballestrero19, A. Banfi20, D. Barducci21, M. Beckingham22, C. Becot23, G. Bélanger24, J. Bellm25, N. Belyaev26, F. U. Bernlochner27, C. Beskidt28, A. Biekötter29, F. Bishara30, W. Bizon31, N. E. Bomark32, M. Bonvini33, S. Borowka34, V. Bortolotto35, S. Boselli36, F. J. Botella37, R. Boughezal38, G. C. Branco39, J. Brehmer40, L. Brenner41, S. Bressler42, I. Brivio43, A. Broggio44, H. Brun45, G. Buchalla46, C. D. Burgard47, A. Calandri48, L. Caminada49, R. Caminal Armadans50, F. Campanario51, J. Campbell52, F. Caola53, C. M. Carloni Calame54, S. Carrazza55, A. Carvalho56, M. Casolino57, O. Cata58, A. Celis59, F. Cerutti60, N. Chanon61, M. Chen62, X. Chen63, B. Chokoufé Nejad64, N. Christensen65, M. Ciuchini66, R. Contino67, T. Corbett68, D. Curtin69, M. Dall'Osso70, A. David71, S. Dawson72, J. de Blas73, W. de Boer74, P. de Castro Manzano75, C. Degrande76, R. L. Delgado77, F. Demartin78, A. Denner79, B. Di Micco80, R. Di Nardo81, S. Dittmaier82, A. Dobado83, T. Dorigo84, F. A. Dreyer85, M. Dührssen86, C. Duhr87, F. Dulat88, K. Ecker89, K. Ellis90, U. Ellwanger91, C. Englert92, D. Espriu93, A. Falkowski94, L. Fayard95, R. Feger96, G. Ferrera97, A. Ferroglia98, N. Fidanza99, T. Figy100, M. Flechl101, D. Fontes102, S. Forte103, P. Francavilla104, E. Franco105, R. Frederix106, A. Freitas107, F. F. Freitas108, F. Frensch109, S. Frixione110, B. Fuks111, E. Furlan112, S. Gadatsch113, J. Gao114, Y. Gao115, M. V. Garzelli116, T. Gehrmann117, R. Gerosa118, M. Ghezzi119, D. Ghosh120, S. Gieseke121, D. Gillberg122, G. F. Giudice123, E. W. N. Glover124, F. Goertz125, D. Gonçalves126, J. Gonzalez-Fraile127, M. Gorbahn128, S. Gori129, C. A. Gottardo130, M. Gouzevitch131, P. Govoni132, D. Gray133, M. Grazzini134, N. Greiner135, A. Greljo136, J. Grigo137, A. V. Gritsan138, R. Gröber139, S. Guindon140, H. E. Haber141, C. Han142, T. Han143, R. Harlander144, M. A. Harrendorf145, H. B. Hartanto146, C. Hays147, S. Heinemeyer148, G. Heinrich149, M. Herrero150, F. Herzog151, B. Hespel152, V. Hirschi153, S. Hoeche154, S. Honeywell155, S. J. Huber156, C. Hugonie157, J. Huston158, A. Ilnicka159, G. Isidori160, B. Jäger161, M. Jaquier162, S. P. Jones163, A. Juste164, S. Kallweit165, A. Kaluza166, A. Kardos167, A. Karlberg168, Z. Kassabov169, N. Kauer170, D. I. Kazakov171, M. Kerner172, W. Kilian173, F. Kling174, K. Köneke175, R. Kogler176, R. Konoplich177, S. Kortner178, S. Kraml179, C. Krause180, F. Krauss181, M. Krawczyk182, A. Kulesza183, S. Kuttimalai184, R. Lane185, A. Lazopoulos186, G. Lee187, P. Lenzi188, I. M. Lewis189, Y. Li190, S. Liebler191, J. Lindert192, X. Liu193, Z. Liu194, F. J. Llanes-Estrada195, H. E. Logan196, D. Lopez-Val197, I. Low198, G. Luisoni199, P. Maierhöfer200, E. Maina201, B. Mansoulié202, H. Mantler203, M. Mantoani204, A. C. Marini205, V. I. Martinez Outschoorn206, S. Marzani207, D. Marzocca208, A. Massironi209, K. Mawatari210, J. Mazzitelli211, A. McCarn212, B. Mellado213, K. Melnikov214, S. B. Menari215, L. Merlo216, C. Meyer217, P. Milenovic218, K. Mimasu219, S. Mishima220, B. Mistlberger221, S. -O. Moch222, A. Mohammadi223, P. F. Monni224, G. Montagna225, M. Moreno Llácer226, N. Moretti227, S. Moretti228, L. Motyka229, A. Mück230, M. Mühlleitner231, S. Munir232, P. Musella233, P. Nadolsky234, D. Napoletano235, M. Nebot236, C. Neu237, M. Neubert238, R. Nevzorov239, O. Nicrosini240, J. Nielsen241, K. Nikolopoulos242, J. M. No243, C. O'Brien244, T. Ohl245, C. Oleari246, T. Orimoto247, D. Pagani248, C. E. Pandini249, A. Papaefstathiou250, A. S. Papanastasiou251, G. Passarino252, B. D. Pecjak253, M. Pelliccioni254, G. Perez255, L. Perrozzi256, F. Petriello257, G. Petrucciani258, E. Pianori259, F. Piccinini260, M. Pierini261, A. Pilkington262, S. Plätzer263, T. Plehn264, R. Podskubka265, C. T. Potter266, S. Pozzorini267, K. Prokofiev268, A. Pukhov269, I. Puljak270, M. Queitsch-Maitland271, J. Quevillon272, D. Rathlev273, M. Rauch274, E. Re275, M. N. Rebelo276, D. Rebuzzi277, L. Reina278, C. Reuschle279, J. Reuter280, M. Riembau281, F. Riva282, A. Rizzi283, T. Robens284, R. Röntsch285, J. Rojo286, J. C. Romão287, N. Rompotis288, J. Roskes289, R. Roth290, G. P. Salam291, R. Salerno292, R. Santos293, V. Sanz294, J. J. Sanz-Cillero295, H. Sargsyan296, U. Sarica297, P. Schichtel298, J. Schlenk299, T. Schmidt300, C. Schmitt301, M. Schönherr302, U. Schubert303, M. Schulze304, S. Sekula305, M. Sekulla306, E. Shabalina307, H. S. Shao308, J. Shelton309, C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous310, S. Y. Shim311, F. Siegert312, A. Signer313, J. P. Silva314, L. Silvestrini315, M. Sjodahl316, P. Slavich317, M. Slawinska318, L. Soffi319, M. Spannowsky320, C. Speckner321, D. M. Sperka322, M. Spira323, O. Stål324, F. Staub325, T. Stebel326, T. Stefaniak327, M. Steinhauser328, I. W. Stewart329, M. J. Strassler330, J. Streicher331, D. M. Strom332, S. Su333, X. Sun334, F. J. Tackmann335, K. Tackmann336, A. M. Teixeira337, R. Teixeira de Lima338, V. Theeuwes339, R. Thorne340, D. Tommasini341, P. Torrielli342, M. Tosi343, F. Tramontano344, Z. Trócsányi345, M. Trott346, I. Tsinikos347, M. Ubiali348, P. Vanlaer349, W. Verkerke350, A. Vicini351, L. Viliani352, E. Vryonidou353, D. Wackeroth354, C. E. M. Wagner355, J. Wang356, S. Wayand357, G. Weiglein358, C. Weiss359, M. Wiesemann360, C. Williams361, J. Winter362, D. Winterbottom363, R. Wolf364, M. Xiao365, L. L. Yang366, R. Yohay367, S. P. Y. Yuen368, G. Zanderighi369, M. Zaro370, D. Zeppenfeld371, R. Ziegler372, T. Zirke373, J. Zupan374
Affiliations: 1eds., 2eds., 3eds., 4eds., 5eds., 6eds., 7eds., 8eds., 9eds., 10The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 11The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 12The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 13The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 14The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 15The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 16The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 17The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 18The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 19The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 20The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 21The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 22The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 23The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 24The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 25The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 26The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 27The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 28The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 29The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 30The LHC Higgs Cross 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This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. Read More

A novel learning Model Predictive Control technique is applied to the autonomous racing problem. The goal of the controller is to minimize the time to complete a lap. The proposed control strategy uses the data from previous laps to improve its performance while satisfying safety requirements. Read More

We present an algebraic solution for the Susceptible-Infective-Removed (SIR) model originally presented by Kermack-McKendrick in 1927. Starting from the differential equation for the removed subjects presented by them in the original paper, we re-write it in a slightly different form in order to derive formally the solution, unless one integration. Then, using algebraic techniques and some well justified numerical assumptions we obtain an analytic solution for the integral. Read More

The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With new 2D materials, truly 2D physics has started to appear (e.g. Read More

Representative compounds of the new family of magnetic materials Gd5-xNdxSi4 were analyzed by X-ray diffraction at the XRD1 beamline at LNLS. To reduce X-ray absorption, thin layers of the powder samples were mounted outside the capillaries and measured in Debye-Scherrer geometry as usual. The X-ray diffraction analyses and the magnetometry results indicate that the behavior of the magnetic transition temperature as a function of Nd content may be directly related to the average of the four smallest interatomic distances between different rare earth sites of the majority phase of each compound. Read More

The excitonic spectra of single layer GeS and GeSe are predicted by ab initio GW-Bethe Salpeter equation calculations. G 0 W 0 calculations for the band structures find a fundamental band gap of 2.85 eV for GeS and 1. Read More

In this document we study the effect of anomalous Higgs boson couplings on non-resonant pair production of Higgs bosons ($HH$) at the LHC. We explore the space of the five parameters $\kappa_{\lambda}$, $\kappa_{t}$, $c_2$, $c_g$, and $c_{2g}$ in terms of the corresponding kinematics of the final state, and describe a partition of the space into a limited number of regions featuring similar phenomenology in the kinematics of $HH$ final state. We call clusters the sets of points belonging to the same region; to each cluster corresponds a representative point which we call a benchmark. Read More

Trapped ions are one of the most promising approaches for the realization of a universal quantum computer. Faster quantum logic gates could dramatically improve the performance of trapped-ion quantum computers, and require the development of suitable high repetition rate pulsed lasers. Here we report on a robust frequency upconverted fiber laser based source, able to deliver 2. Read More

In this paper we study the asymptotic nonlinear dynamics of scalar semilinear parabolic problems reaction-diffusion type when the diffusion coefficient becomes large in a subregion which is interior to the domain. We obtain, under suitable assumptions, that the family of attractors behaves continuously and we exhibit the rate of convergence. An accurate description of localized large diffusion is necessary. Read More

We exhibit a class of singularly perturbed parabolic problems which the asymptotic behavior can be described by a system of ordinary differential equation. We estimate the convergence of attractors in the Hausdorff metric by rate of convergence of resolvent operators. Application to spatial homogenization and large diffusion except in a neighborhood of a point will be considered. Read More

We analyze the energy spectrum of graphene in the presence of spin-orbit coupling and a unidirectionally periodic Zeeman field, focusing on the stability and location of Dirac points it may support. It is found that the Dirac points at the $K$ and $K'$ points are generically moved to other locations in the Brillouin zone, but that they remain present when the Zeeman field $\vec{\Delta}(x)$ integrates to zero within a unit cell. A large variety of locations for the Dirac points is shown to be possible: when $\vec\Delta \parallel \hat{z}$ they are shifted from their original locations along the direction perpendicular to the superlattice axis, while realizations of $\vec\Delta(x)$ that rotate periodically move the Dirac points to locations that can reflect the orbit of the rotating electron spin as it moves through a unit cell. Read More

We present the activities of the 'New Physics' working group for the 'Physics at TeV Colliders' workshop (Les Houches, France, 1-19 June, 2015). Our report includes new physics studies connected with the Higgs boson and its properties, direct search strategies, reinterpretation of the LHC results in the building of viable models and new computational tool developments. Important signatures for searches for natural new physics at the LHC and new assessments of the interplay between direct dark matter searches and the LHC are also considered. Read More

Point defects in the binary group-IV monochalcogenide monolayers of SnS, SnSe, GeS, GeSe are investigated using density-functional-theory calculations. Several stable configurations are found for oxygen defects, however we give evidence that these materials are less prone to oxidation than phosphorene, with which monochalcogenides are isoelectronic and share the same orthorhombic structure. Concurrent oxygen defects are expected to be vacancies and substitutional oxygen. Read More

We propose related schemes to generate arbitrarily shaped single photons, i.e. photons with an arbitrary temporal profile, and coherent state superpositions using simple optical elements. Read More

We show that the Lyapunov exponents of quantum systems under monitoring are sensitive to the choice of measurement strategy. In particular, there is a region between the deep quantum regime and the classical limit where the choice of monitoring has a crucial effect on the complex behaviour of the system, leading to either the emergence or suppression of chaos. Our work shows that this effect stems from the interplay between the underlying nonlinear dynamics and the ways the system couples to the quantum noise for different measurement scenarios. Read More

In this contribution we study the Klein-Gordon oscillator on the curved background within the Kaluza-Klein theory. The problem of interaction between particles coupled harmonically with a topological defects in Kaluza-Klein theory is studied. We consider a series of topological defects, that treat the Klein-Gordon oscillator coupled to this background and find the energy levels and corresponding eigenfunctions in these cases. Read More

Group-IV monochalcogenides are a family of two-dimensional puckered materials with an orthorhombic structure that is comprised of polar layers. In this article, we use first principles calculations to show the multistability of monolayer SnS and GeSe, two prototype materials where the direction of the puckering can be switched by application of tensile stress or electric field. Furthermore, the two inequivalent valleys in momentum space, which are dictated by the puckering orientation, can be excited selectively using linearly polarized light, and this provides an additional tool to identify the polarization direction. Read More

We study the dynamics of the family $f_c(x, y)= (xy+c, x)$ of endomorphisms of $\mathbb{R}^2$ and $\mathbb{C}^2$, where $c$ is a real or complex parameter. Such maps can be seen as perturbations of the map $f_0(x,y)=(xy,x)$, which is a complexification of the Anosov torus map $(u,v) \mapsto (u+v,u)$. Read More

We examine the use of optomechanically-generated squeezing to obtain a sensitivity enhancement for interferometers in the gravitational-wave band. The intrinsic dispersion characteristics of optomechanical squeezing around the mechanical frequency are able to produce squeezing at different quadratures over the spectrum, a feature required by gravitational-wave interferometers to beat the standard quantum limit over an extended frequency range. Under realistic assumptions we show that the amount of available squeezing and the intrinsic quadrature rotation may provide, compared to similar amounts of fixed-quadrature squeezing, a detection advantage. Read More

The relation between unusual Mexican-hat band dispersion, ferromagnetism and ferroelasticity is investigated using a combination of analytical, first-principles and phenomenological methods. The class of material with Mexican-hat band edge is studied using the $\alpha$-SnO monolayer as a prototype. Such band edge causes a van Hove singularity diverging with $\frac{1}{\sqrt{E}}$, and in p-type material leads to spatial and/or time-reversal spontaneous symmetry breaking. Read More

Fast entangling gates have been proposed for trapped ions that are orders of magnitude faster than current implementations. We present here a detailed analysis of the challenges involved in performing a successful fast gate. We show that the RWA is a stable approximation with respect to pulse numbers: the timescale on which we can neglect terms rotating at the atomic frequency is negligibly affected by the number of pulses in the fast gate. Read More

Ion traps are a promising platform for the implementation of various quantum technologies, particularly quantum simulation. Unfortunately, the entangling gates required for digital quantum simulations rely on the virtual excitation of the motional modes of the trap, making the necessary operations too slow with respect to the system coherence times. In this work, we propose a method of implementing a crucial multiqubit gate, through a scheme of fast two-qubit gates, able to perform in shorter time and with more precision than existing alternatives. Read More

We use first principles calculations to investigate the lattice properties of group-IV monochalcogenides. These include static dielectric permittivity, elastic and piezoelectric tensors. For the monolayer, it is found that the static permittivity, besides acquiring a dependence on the interlayer distance, is comparatively higher than in the 3D system. Read More

Strongly bound excitons confined in two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors are dipoles with a perfect in-plane orientation. In a vertical stack of semiconducting 2D crystals, such in-plane excitonic dipoles are expected to efficiently couple across van der Waals gap due to strong interlayer Coulomb interaction and exchange their energy. However, previous studies on heterobilayers of group 6 transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) found that the exciton decay dynamics is dominated by interlayer charge transfer (CT) processes. Read More

Tin (II) sulfide (SnS) is a layered mineral found in nature. In this paper, we study the two-dimensional form of this material using a combination of \emph{ab initio} calculation and $\mathbf{k}\cdot\mathbf{p}$ theory. In particular, we address the valley properties and the optical selection rules of 2D SnS. Read More

Heusler alloys are widely studied due to their interesting structural and magnetic properties, like magnetic memory shape ability, coupled magneto-structural phase transitions and half-metallicity; ruled, for many cases, by the valence electrons number ($N_v$). The present work focuses on the magnetocaloric potentials of half-metals, exploring the effect of $N_v$ on the magnetic entropy change, preserving half-metallicity. The test bench is the Si-rich side of the half-metallic series Fe$_2$MnSi$_{1-x}$Ga$_x$. Read More

Discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) relies on predictive models for characteristic features from miRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs). The short length of miRNA genes and the lack of pronounced sequence features complicate this task. To accommodate the peculiarities of plant and animal miRNAs systems, tools for both systems have evolved differently. Read More

Fast entangling gates for trapped ions offer vastly improved gate operation times relative to implemented gates, as well as approaches to trap scaling. Gates on neighbouring ions only involve local ions when performed sufficiently fast, and we find that even a fast gate between distant ions with few degrees of freedom restores all the motional modes given more stringent gate speed conditions. We compare pulsed fast gate schemes, defined by a timescale faster than the trap period, and find that our proposed scheme has less stringent requirements on laser repetition rate for achieving arbitrary gate time targets and infidelities well below $10^{-4}$. Read More

New physics theories often depend on a large number of free parameters. The precise values of those parameters in some cases drastically affect the resulting phenomenology of fundamental physics processes, while in others finite variations can leave it basically invariant at the level of detail experimentally accessible. When designing a strategy for the analysis of experimental data in the search for a signal predicted by a new physics model, it appears advantageous to categorize the parameter space describing the model according to the corresponding kinematical features of the final state. Read More

We give two general constructions of braid equivalences which exist between certain deformations of the 2-branched Horsehoe map. We then give numerical evidence suggesting that these constructions of braid equivalences are always realised in the H\'enon family. Read More

The Wigner rotation angle for a particle in a circular motion in the Schwarzschild spacetime is obtained via the Fermi-Walker transport of spinors. Then, by applying the WKB approximation, a possible application of the Fermi-Walker transport of spinors in relativistic EPR correlations is discussed, where it is shown that the spins of the correlated particle undergo a precession in an analogous way to that obtained by Terashima and Ueda [H. Terashima and M. Read More

The group-IV monochalcogenides SnS, GeS, SnSe and GeSe form a family within the wider group of semiconductor `phosphorene analogues'. Here, we used first principles calculations to investigate systematically their structural, electronic and optical properties, analysing the changes associated with the reduction of dimensionality, from bulk to monolayer or bilayer form. We show that all those binary phosphorene analogues are semiconducting, with bandgap energies covering part of the infra-red and visible range, and in most cases higher than phosphorene. Read More

Two-dimensional dilute magnetic semiconductors can provide fundamental insights in the very nature of magnetic orders and their manipulation through electron and hole doping. Despite the fundamental physics, due to the large charge density control capability in these materials, they can be extremely important in spintronics applications such as spin valve and spin-based transistors. In this article, we studied a two-dimensional dilute magnetic semiconductors consisting of phosphorene monolayer doped with cobalt atoms in substitutional and interstitial defects. Read More

The optical response of phosphorene can be gradually changed by application of moderate uniaxial compression, as the material undergoes the transition into an indirect gap semiconductor and eventually into a semimetal. Strain tunes not only the gap between the valence band and conduction band local extrema, but also the effective masses, and in consequence, the exciton anisotropy and binding strength. In this article, we consider from a theoretical point of view how the exciton stability and the resulting luminescence energy evolves under uniaxial strain. Read More

Ultrathin black phosphorus, or phosphorene, is the second known elementary two-dimensional material that can be exfoliated from a bulk van der Waals crystal. Unlike graphene it is a semiconductor with a sizeable band gap and its excellent electronic properties make it attractive for applications in transistor, logic, and optoelectronic devices. However, it is also the first widely investigated two dimensional electronic material to undergo degradation upon exposure to ambient air. Read More

The development of a spintronics device relies on efficient generation of spin polarized currents and their electric field controlled manipulation. While observation of exceptionally long spin relaxation lengths make graphene an intriguing material for spintronics studies, modulation of spin currents by gate field is almost impossible due to negligibly small intrinsic spin orbit coupling (SOC) of graphene. In this work, we create an artificial interface between monolayer graphene and few-layers semiconducting tungsten disulfide (WS2). Read More

We construct a family $\{\Phi_t\}_{t\in[0,1]}$ of homeomorphisms of the two-torus isotopic to the identity, for which all of the rotation sets $\rho(\Phi_t)$ can be described explicitly. We analyze the bifurcations and typical behavior of rotation sets in the family, providing insight into the general questions of toral rotation set bifurcations and prevalence. We show that there is a full measure subset of $[0,1]$, consisting of infinitely many mutually disjoint non-trivial closed intervals, on each of which the rotation set mode locks to a constant polygon with rational vertices; that the generic rotation set in the Hausdorff topology has infinitely many extreme points, accumulating on a single totally irrational extreme point at which there is a unique supporting line; and that, although $\rho(t)$ varies continuously with $t$, the set of extreme points of $\rho(t)$ does not. Read More

We show that oxidation of phosphorene can lead to the formation of a new family of planar (2D) and tubular (1D) oxides and sub-oxides, most of them insulating. This confers to black phosphorus a native oxide that can be used as barrier material and protective layer. Further, the bandgap of phosphorene oxides depends on the oxygen concentration, suggesting that controlled oxidation can be used as a means to engineer the bandgap. Read More

Oxygen, invariably present in a normal working environment, is a fundamental cause of the degradation of phosphorene. Using first-principles calculations, we show that for each oxygen atom adsorbed onto phosphorene there is an energy release of about 2 eV. Although the most stable forms of oxygen are electrically inactive and lead only to minor distortions of the lattice, there are a number of low energy metastable forms which introduce deep donor and/or acceptor levels in the gap. Read More

The excitonic behavior of anisotropic two-dimensional crystals is investigated using numerical methods. We employ a screened potential arising due to the system polarizability to solve the central-potential problem using the Numerov approach. The dependence of the exciton energies on the interaction strength and mass anisotropy is demonstrated. Read More